The Urgent Design Questions of Our Time

George Dyson, from his 2019 EDGE New Year’s Essay:

There is now more code than ever, but it is increasingly difficult to find anyone who has their hands on the wheel. Individual agency is on the wane. Most of us, most of the time, are following instructions delivered to us by computers rather than the other way around. The digital revolution has come full circle and the next revolution, an analog revolution, has begun.

For a long time, the central objects of concern for designers have been interfaces: the touchpoints where users interact with systems. This is changing. The central objects of concern now are systems’ underlying models. Increasingly, these models aren’t artifacts designed in the traditional sense. Instead, they emerge from systems that learn about themselves and the contexts they’re operating in, adapt to those contexts, and in so doing change them.

The urgent design questions of our time aren’t about the usability or fitness-to-purpose of forms; they’re about the ethics and control of systems:

  • Are the system’s adaptation cycles virtuous or vicious?
  • Who determines the incentives that drive them?
  • How do we effectively prototype emergent systems so we can avoid unintended consequences?
  • Where, when, and how do we intervene most effectively?
  • Who intervenes?

Childhood’s End: The digital revolution isn’t over but has turned into something else