• When designing a system, we want to understand how its users think about the subject domain, what the system needs to show them, and how it will be implemented. That is why we must consider three separate models.
  • “… when software becomes part of society, all of society’s problems get expressed in software.” Benedict Evans on regulating tech.
  • Complex maladaptive systems. (h/t Tim O’Reilly)
  • Mark Hurst is losing faith in UX; Scott Berkun offers suggestions on how to restore it.
  • Browser maker Vivaldi introduced a new tab stacking feature. (Would you use this?)
  • “Microsoft Viva isn’t an app or even a service but more of a platform for improving remote work and helping businesses adjust to it.” Does Microsoft’s new work platform herald a revival of the intranet?
  • When I sit to watch something on one of the streaming video services, I often find myself unable to choose. There’s so much there! Later this year, Netflix will release a shuffle play feature that should help those of us paralyzed by choice. (Maybe this is also a way of restoring serendipity to television?)
  • Birdwatch, an intriguing initiative from Twitter to combat misinformation on the platform through community participation.
  • Interactive Principles: “a deck of learning science principles for designing educational games.” Applicable to other domains as well. (h/t Christina Wodtke, via Stephen P. Anderson)
  • A team of volunteers is building a virtual theme park featuring defunct real-world attractions. The first to be finished: Walt Disney World’s long-departed (and much missed) 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage. (This might be the nudge I needed to buy a VR headset.)

A version of this post first appeared in my newsletter.